All posts by Frederick Linsmeyer

A regular pop-drinking, hockey-watching, snow-shovelling Canadian, Frederick, aka Nephrus, loves his anime. Born and raised in Vancouver, British Columbia, Frederick runs amok between his hometown and the states of Illinois and Texas, spending time with friends, at anime conventions and looking for some good burgers or sashimi.

Metro Vancouver and Transit

Transit in Metro Vancouver is always a hot button topic. Anything and everything from fares, bus stops, right up to the technology used for transit vehicles. It seems that in the last decade or so, TransLink (the operating company behind Metro Vancouver’s public transportation system) and the government (both municipal and provincial) have proven they are incapable of effectively providing any sort of reliable operation to commuters in the Lower Mainland.

I’ve lived in the Vancouver area all my life and watched SkyTrain grow beyond the New Westminster station to Columbia, then over the Fraser to Scott Road and eventually out to King George, the Millennium Line when it only stopped at Sapperton, when there was no fare gates, and that you had to walk up steps when boarding a bus. Before the turn of the century, everything was branded as BC Transit, in its red, white and blue colour scheme of the Union Jack on our provincial flag. While there have been some major improvements and changes to the way we get around the region, not all of it is positive.

Many of those who live in Vancouver proper, Burnaby, New Westminster and parts of the Tri-Cities (Port Moody, Port Coquitlam and Coquitlam), transit is generally available and reliable. The story changes to the communities south of the Fraser River, where buses are frequently delayed or non-existent, and local governments ignore the advice of the people that elected them into office by offering unpopular methods of transportation.

That unpopular method is LRT (Light Rail Transit). For the last decade or more, the City of Surrey has been doing studies and waffling over the idea of how best to connect its many town centres (Surrey Central, Newton, Guildford) together with the existing SkyTrain network. In the last year or two, the city has made the firm decision to implement LRT going down King George Boulevard to Newton and out east along 104 Avenue to Guildford. I could go on and on about why this is a terrible idea (read my thoughts on this), but once the decision from the provincial and federal governments to issue funding for construction for the LRT, there has been a hard stance from all levels government that LRT is going forward. Their lack of vision and all the computer-generated imagery showcasing a happy community with less cars and more pedestrians is short-sighted. Surrey is a growing city and a decade after LRT is in place, the city and TransLink will again be petitioning the provincial and federal governments for expanded SkyTrain service, thus wasting more of our tax dollars which could have been spent efficiently from the get go. The LRT will eventually be dug up and replaced with an elevated SkyTrain guideway (akin to when the express bus lanes down No. 3 Road in Richmond were built to great fanfare only to be torn up a few years later for the construction of the Canada Line).

Now Vancouver is considering LRT along a major east-west thoroughfare: 41st Avenue. Yes, the 41 bus is always crowded and yes it takes forever to get from Joyce-Collingwood station out to the University of British Columbia. Here we go again. If you drive along 41st Avenue, you’ll notice it’s not very wide and always congested. Lined with single family homes, the city will need to expropriate a large number of properties to make this work, driving up the cost exponentially. While the city is trying to find ways to move people to their destinations with fast and affordable service, LRT, again is not the right idea. You’re basically moving the bus onto rails at additional cost with limited room for increased capacity. And with the Oakridge area undergoing major renovations to include high density residential space, this idea will fall flat on its face. A better solution would be dedicated HOV lanes for transit vehicles and cars with two or more occupants.

Furthermore to TransLink’s and the government’s poor knowledge on building transit is the Canada Line. Completed in 2009 before the 2010 Winter Olympic Games, the Canada Line became too popular for its own good. Listening to the complaints of local business groups in Richmond that two tracks would make their establishments lose money because of an unsightly sterile concrete guideway, the line became single tracked after Lansdowne station (and out at the Vancouver International Airport). But it’s no joke now that the density in the island city is increasing with plans to tear down Lansdowne Mall to replace it with new high-rises and commercial space. But that’s not the worst of it. The Canada Line was crippled from the beginning with short platforms limiting the trains to two cars total. This lack of thought for future capacity has filled station platforms and crowded trains. TransLink has ordered more cars from Hyundai Rotem (the group that manufactured the first trains) to add more to increase service. There was even talk of making the trains into three cars, but that never materialized. Now Vancouver and Richmond are building up density along this rapid transit route which cannot possibly keep pace with that growth. Let’s not forget the clandestine construction which pitted local merchants along Cambie Street against TransLink and the builders over lost sales from lack of customers avoiding said construction (they’re now finally being awarded damages).

Then there was the Compass card debacle. How many transit systems around the world use fare gates/turnstiles and contactless cards for admission? Quite a few, and yet TransLink managed to drop the ball repeatedly because they didn’t redesign the fare structure beforehand. Trying to get proven technology to work with TransLink’s zone-based fare structure was a headache for the company and the public in general as costs spiralled out of control to the tune of $194 million dollars. The fare gates sat open almost four years before they were all closed in July 2016 finally forcing riders to tap in or out and ending nearly 30 years of the honour system.

The only recently positive news coming from TransLink and the levels of government is the extension of the Millennium Line out to Arbutus Street (and hopefully further out to the University of British Columbia). The Millennium Line has long been reviled as the “SkyTrain to nowhere” and its daily passenger counts are far less than the Expo Line, this has the potential to bring longer trains (no more two-car Mark II trains) as it connects with busy Broadway corridor. As long as TransLink plays its cards right and builds stations with longer platforms, this addition to SkyTrain becomes a much needed respite to the crowded 99 B-Line buses.

And to add a cherry on-top of it all, a TransLink bus stop in Pitt Meadows was named the worst in all of North America. Why? Because it’s on the paved shoulder of Lougheed Highway against a jersey barrier. Passengers are forced to endure speeding vehicles if they wait on the shoulder or they have lumber over the cement barrier to board their bus when it arrives. TransLink said they would address this, but why was it built in the first place? How could this ever have been a good idea from the beginning?

While TransLink continues to roll along like a sow in slop, it’s safe to say their executive leadership (along with the assistance of the Mayor’s Council*) will continue to draft up impractical and ill-considered plans to expand and “improve” the future of transit in Metro Vancouver.

*While TransLink is an independent entity, the Mayor’s Council (that’s 21 Metro Vancouver mayors, the Chief of the Tsawwassen First Nation, and the elected representative of Electoral Area “A”) pretty much has final say over the costs of projects, TransLink board appointments, fare increases, and executive compensation plans.

My Hero Academia film coming to Cineplex theatres September 2018

My Hero Academia: Two Heroes

Promotional artwork for My Hero Academia: Two Heroes.

When FUNimation revealed that the My Hero Academia would be coming to theatres in Canada and the United States in September 2018, there wasn’t a list immediately available of participating theatres for the great white north.

That list is now available, with a number of Cineplex locations across Canada (excluding Alberta, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island) hosting multiple screenings in English, and in Japanese with English subtitles in late September.

  • Cineplex Cinemas Coquitlam and VIP
    170 Schoolhouse Street, Coquitlam, BC
  • Cineplex Cinemas Langley
    #20090, 91A Avenue, Langley, BC
  • The Park Theatre
    3440 Cambie Street, Vancouver, BC
  • Cineplex Odeon Park & Tilford Cinemas
    200-333 Brooksbank Avenue, N. Vancouver, BC
  • Cineplex Odeon McGillivray Cinemas and VIP
    2190 McGillivray Boulevard, Winnipeg, MB
  • Cineplex Cinemas Mount Pearl
    760 Topsail Road, St. John’s, NL
  • Cineplex Cinemas Park Lane
    5657 Spring Garden Road, Halifax, NS
  • Galaxy Cinemas Guelph
    485 Woodlawn Road West, Guelph, ON
  • SilverCity London Cinemas
    1680 Richmond Street, London, ON
  • Galaxy Cinemas Peterborough
    320 Water Street, Peterborough, ON
  • Cineplex Cinemas Winston Churchill
    2081 Winston Park Drive, Oakville, ON
  • SilverCity Burlington Cinemas
    1250 Brant Street, Burlington, ON
  • SilverCity Thunder Bay Cinemas
    850 North May Street, Thunder Bay, ON
  • Cineplex Odeon Eglinton Town Centre Cinemas
    22 Lebovic Avenue, Toronto, ON
  • Cineplex Odeon South Keys Cinemas
    2214 Bank Street, Ottawa, ON
  • SilverCity Sudbury Cinemas
    355 Barrydowne Road, Sudbury, ON
  • Cineplex Odeon Niagara Square Cinemas
    7555 Montrose Road, Niagara Falls, ON
  • Galaxy Cinemas Barrie
    72 Commerce Park Drive, Barrie, ON
  • SilverCity Windsor Cinemas
    4611 Walker Road, Windsor, ON
  • Cinéma Cineplex Quartier Cavendish
    Le Mail Cavendish, 5800 boulevard Cavendish, Cote Saint-Luc, QC
  • Scotiabank Theatre Saskatoon and VIP
    347-2nd Avenue South, Saskatoon, SK
  • Cineplex Cinemas Normanview
    420 McCarthy Boulevard North, Unit 26, Regina, SK

Be sure to check with the theatre for dates and times as they may change.

Source: Cineplex

Live-action Bleach movie coming to Netflix Sept 14, 2018

Tite Kubo’s Bleach has joined the ranks of other popular anime and manga receiving live-action feature films. Fans living outside of Japan can catch the live Bleach movie on Netflix later this month.

Identified as a Netflix Original title, Bleach revolves around Ichigo Kurosaki (portrayed by Sota Fukushi), a teenager pressed into service as an emergency soul reaper. In addition to guiding spirits through to the underworld, Ichigo uses his newfound powers to protect those in the living world from malevolent spectres known as Hollows. Directed by Shinsuke Sato, the film was released in Japan on July 20th, 2018.

Bleach becomes available on the Netflix streaming service Friday, September 14th, 2018.

Sources: Vulture, CB, Warner Bros.

Nintendo Direct on Sept 6, 2018 for new Switch and 3DS titles

Editor’s Note: The Nintendo Direct is rescheduled to Thursday, September 13th, 2018 at 3:00 pm PDT / 6:00 pm EDT. The original date and time was postponed due to a serious earthquake in Hokkaido.

Tomorrow at 3:00 pm PDT/6:00 pm EDT, Nintendo will host a Nintendo Direct live video to announce new titles for its Switch and 3DS consoles.

Nintendo Direct is the Japanese gaming company’s way of sharing updates on its hardware and software properties. Catch the video here on Thursday afternoon.

Source: YouTube

Chrom, Dark Samus, King K. Rool, Simon Belmont and Richter Belmont join Super Smash Bros. roster

This morning, Sora Ltd. director, Masahiro Sakurai, hosted a Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Direct video jam packed with teasers of the upcoming title for the Nintendo Switch.

Five new characters join the overflowing roster, three of which are “echo fighters” — clones of existing characters with minor differences in actions. Newcomers include vampire hunters Simon Belmont and Richter Belmont (Simon’s echo fighter) from the Castlevania series, Kremling commander King K. Rool from Donkey Kong, Ylissian prince Chrom (an echo fighter based on Roy) from Fire Emblem Awakening and the phazon-covered Dark Samus (another echo fighter based on Samus from Metroid Prime).

Over 100 levels are expected, many of which are returning from previous games in the Smash Bros. franchise, but some are new — Dracula’s Castle from Castlevania and New Donk City Hall from Super Mario Odyssey. All stages are available; no need to unlock them and all will support eight-player battles.

Even more music is being packed into Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, with some 900 songs included. That’s almost 28 hours of music! The Nintendo Switch can function as a portable music player when the screen is turned off in handheld mode. Samples of the tracks are available on the official Super Smash Bros. web site.

There’s still more! Classic Mode is back, letting players pick a character to battle through a predetermined set of stages and opponents. Stamina Battle lets players fight other characters, whittling away their stamina until it reaches zero to be the victor. Squad Strike is five-on-five or three-on-three battles where five players fight five or three other characters in battle. Tourney Mode lets a maximum of 32 players go head-to-head in a tournament so they can advance until there’s one person left. In Smashdown, once a character is used, they become unavailable for the rest of the game, forcing players to pick someone they might not be familiar with. Training mode includes a grid that shows the distance a character can fly after being hit, and how far they need to be to defend… or attack.

There’s just so much being crammed into Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, which means there will definitely be more goodies coming our way.

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate comes out on December 7th, 2018 on the Nintendo Switch.

Source: YouTube

AniRevo 2018 photos

Nothing says summer like sizzling cosplay! AniRevo returned to the Vancouver Convention Centre in downtown Vancouver for three days of Japanese pop culture and entertainment, complete with attendees in costume of their favourite series.


The action continues on Sunday. If you’ve missed it, check out the photos on Gallery.

Well I’ll be go to hell, an Uncharted fan film

While the Uncharted movie is trapped in development hell, actor Nathan Fillion has teamed up with director Allan Ungar for a short fan film on the popular Uncharted action-adventure game series.

A captured Nathan Drake, played by Fillion, is held in a Mexican mansion accused of stealing from an auction. Diego (Geno Segers) plies Drake for the whereabouts of the stolen treasure, but Drake’s humorous banter isn’t enough to prevent the short and vicious El Tigre (Ernie Reyes Jr.) from being called in to soften him up. However, the cavalry isn’t far behind as the cigar-smoking Sully (Stephen Lang) is just outside. Even the adventurous reporter Elena Fisher makes an appearance.

It’s 15 minutes of fun, filled with fight scenes, quotes referencing previous Uncharted games, and a hope that one day, we’ll actually get to see a feature-length film as good as this.

Source: YouTube

My Hero Academia movie coming to Canada and US September 2018

My Hero Academia: Two Heroes

Promotional artwork for My Hero Academia: Two Heroes.

Plus Ultra! The heroes of Class 1-A are coming to the big screen this September in their first feature film. My Hero Academia: Two Heroes will screen at select theatres in Canada and the US across five days in both Japanese with English subtitles and in English.

The announcement came earlier today at San Diego Comic Con when English voice actors Justin Briner and Christopher Sabat in an interview with IGN. Briner and Sabat lend their voices in the English dub of My Hero Academia which is licensed by FUNimation.

The English dub will screen on the September 25th, 27th, and 29th; the Japanese with English subtitles on September 26th and October 2nd.

Izuku Midoriya, alias Deku, a young hero in training, receives an invite to attend a Quirk expo with his idol All Might. At the event, Deku encounters Melissa, a girl who had a similar Quirkless upbringing. The fun doesn’t last as a group of villains override the complex’s security system, putting their evil plan in action. Can the heroes help stop these villains and save the day?

Source: FUNimation

Bleach volume 74

<em>Bleach</em> volume 74

Bleach volume 74

It’s been a long journey for Ichigo Kurosaki, from that fateful day he became a soul reaper, with the manga series coming to a close. Volume 74 of Bleach, the last chapters, are coming this fall.

It’s the final fight, the last stand between the Soul Reapers and Quincies as Ichigo heads into battle against Yhwach. Can Ichigo and the rest of Soul Reapers stand up to enormous and endless power of the leader of the Quincies?

The last volume of Bleach, number 74, will hit store shelves in North America on October 2nd, 2018.

Photos from Carnaval del Sol 2018

When the sun comes out, so do the people and for the 10th annual Carnaval del Sol, the plazas were packed and the lines long for Latin American cuisine, music, culture and shopping. The sights, sounds and smells brought together so many Central and South American countries as our neighbours and friends.

Couldn’t make it out? Browse through the photos from Sunday on Gallery.


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